Web Extras: Hogan’s Alley #21

No matter how many pages an issue of Hogan’s Alley has, it’s never enough! We wanted to share some content that we either couldn’t fit into the issue or also want to showcase here! (Click to enlarge any of the following images.) If this content intrigues you, please consider taking a moment to subscribe to Hogan’s Alley and receive issue #21 (cover at right) as the first issue on your subscription!

Issue #21 featured a lengthy, fascinating and never-before-published interview with the legendary and famously private George Herriman, creator of Krazy Kat, universally acknowledged as one of cartooning’s great artistic achievements. Michael Tisserand, author of the brilliant new Herriman biography Krazy: A Life in Black and White (and who discovered the interview in the course of researching his book, available for purchase here), shared some unique Herriman pieces with us and placed them in historical context:

The Gift of Krazy, Through the Years

Few, if any, cartoonists were as generous with their art as George Herriman. In fact, tracking his gifts through the years was a primary way I was able to learn about his friendships and activities–including the gift of his wondrous painting to Boyden Sparkes that led to the discovery of Sparkes’ interviews with Herriman and other cartoonists. Following the publication of Krazy: George Herriman, A Life in Black and White, I learned of two gifts that Herriman had given to young friends–32 years apart.

Peanuts and the Bard

Michael P. Jensen, who has written about the comics-Shakespeare connection in past issues of Hogan’s Alley, this time brought his scholarly focus to Charles Schulz’s Peanuts (as well as some other Schulz works). Here are some of the strips he annotates in the article (but you’ll have to read it to grasp the breadth and depth of his analysis):

 

Exploring the Jack Davis Archives

This issue featured some rare and never-before-published work from the archives of the great Jack Davis. Author Benno Rothschild (with the cooperation of the Jack Davis family) presented these rarities with biographical information to tell the story of one of cartooning’s most astonishing bodies of work.

Time Magazine (Dec. 9, 1974)

Jack Davis contributed numerous covers to Time magazine, and Hogan’s Alley #21 discussed the process he used in developing cover concepts. Here are the pencil sketches he produced for the Dec. 9, 1974, issue along with the published cover:

Time Magazine (March 8, 1976)

 

Satirizing Obama

Making fun of the president has long been the bread and butter of editorial cartoonists. But depicting the nation’s first black president posed unique challenges, and Steve Greenberg spoke with a number of editorial cartoonists for his insightful column in Hogan’s Alley #21. Here, we present some of the cartoons he discussed by some of the cartoonists he interviewed:

 

If you enjoyed these Web Extras, be sure to check out the Web Extras from Hogan’s Alley #20!

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